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Julie Gilkay

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Halloween spending expected to reach record levels

MENASHA — Halloween spending is expected to soar to pre-pandemic levels, with 65% of Americans intending to celebrate the fall holiday.

According to the National Retail Federation’s annual survey conducted by Prosper Insights & Analytics, consumer spending on Halloween-related items is expected to reach an all-time high of $10.14 billion, up from $8.05 billion in 2020. Total spending on costumes is the highest it has been since 2017 at $3.32 billion.

“Americans plan to spend more than ever to make this Halloween a memorable one,” NRF President and CEO Matthew Shay said.

Forty-six percent plan to dress in costume this year. Here’s what is expected to be popular this Halloween.

  • Top costumes for children in order of popularity: Spider-Man, princess, Batman, superhero, witch, ghost, pumpkin, Superman, zombie and Avengers characters.
  • Top costumes for adults: Witch, vampire, ghost, cat, pirate, Batman, zombie, Superman/the Joker, Spiderman, Dracula, Avengers character.
  • Costume choices often are influenced by what we see in the movies or on TV. This year what’s trending is Cruella De Vil, Wednesday Addams, “Bridgerton,” “The Great British Baking Show” costumes and “Schitt’s Creek” characters like Moira Rose.
  • Every year pop culture and social media impacts what’s hot. Unicorns, which have been big the past few Halloweens, will be out in force again this year. Other top costume ideas will be Jeff Bezos in space, virtual work meeting, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Simone Biles and The Weeknd.
  • And don’t forget your pet! Dressing our pets has become a big part of Halloween fun, and one in five intending to dress their pet up for Halloween. The most popular pet costumes are pumpkin, hot dog and superhero, according to the NRF.

Since 1971, Goodwill NCW has served as the Original Halloween Headquarters.

  • Score secondhand costumes that are ready to wear or create your own unique look that frights or delights.
  • Find new and ready-made accessories, masks, makeup, wigs and other fun items to complete your costume.
  • Feel good about your Halloween purchases. Not only do you get a one-of-a-kind look with our donated treasures or ready-to-wear costumes, you also are helping your local community by providing job training and opportunities to people with barriers to employment.

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org

Goodwill NCW providing back-to-school vouchers for families in need

MENASHA — Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin (Goodwill NCW) is supporting families in need this back-to-school season by providing in-store vouchers for merchandise.

The back-to-school vouchers are part of Goodwill NCW’s larger GoodNeighbor program, which provided nearly $600,000 in free merchandise to people in need in 2020. Goodwill NCW partners with community organizations throughout 35 counties in north central Wisconsin to provide agencies with $10 vouchers to give to clients, allowing them to select items from Goodwill retail stores and training centers.

“Goodwill NCW is committed to supporting individuals, families and communities by giving parents a hand up in providing children with the clothing and shoes they need for the new school year,” said Jennie Moore, Goodwill NCW Vice President-Mission Services. “The need in our communities is always great, but it is especially so this year as kids return to in-person learning and families continue to struggle with the financial impact of COVID-19.”

More than 23,000 vouchers have been distributed to date to community agencies for the back-to-school season for back-to-school fairs, referrals and other means of distribution, including 200 for the Eighth Annual Feed the Homeless BBQ on Aug. 28 in Green Bay.

For organizations looking to partner with Goodwill NCW for back-to-school vouchers and the GoodNeighbor program, contact November Behm at nbehm@goodwillncw.org.

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton Outlet Store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

Back-to-school spending to reach record levels as students return to schools

MENASHA — Families plan to spend record amounts on back to school in 2021 as they prepare for a return to in-person learning, according to the annual survey released July 19 by the National Retail Federation and Prosper Insights & Analytics.

“The pandemic forced parents and their school-aged children to quickly adapt to virtual learning, and they did it with an incredible amount of resolve and flexibility,” NRF President and CEO Matthew Shay said in the survey. “We enter the new school year with plans to return to the classroom, and retailers are prepared to help Americans find and purchase whatever they need to make this transition as seamless as possible.”

Parents with children in elementary through high school plan to spend an average of $849, topping the previous record by $59, according to the NRF. Total back-to-school spending is expected to reach a record $37.1 billion, up from $33.9 billion last year and an all-time high in the survey’s 18-year history. Total back-to-college spending is expected to reach a record $71 billion, up from $67.7 billion in 2020.

Additionally, 43% of all back-to-class shoppers say they plan to use money they received from government stimulus to purchase items for the upcoming school year.

Other statistics from the survey:

  • After a year of casual dress during learning from home, students and parents are ready to welcome new first day of school outfits. Half (49%) of parents with school-age children say their kids are most excited to shop for apparel this year, up from 42% last year.
  • Clothes and accessories top the list of items parents say their kids are most excited to shop for.

Families can stretch their dollar by shopping thrift. By doing so, families also are helping their community by providing job-skills training to people with disabilities and other barriers to employment.

Here are our budget-friendly tips on shopping thrift for back to school:

  • Donated items with the color tag of the week are 50% off the ticketed price. Shop clearance racks for extra savings.
  • Go often. Frequency and quick decision-making can pay off. Goodwill and other thrift stores are in the business of donations, and what is donated is one of a kind. That means if you see something you like, buy it. You might never see anything like it again. Plus, if you go often you’ll have a better chance of scoring some of those amazing finds.
  • Jeans are a back-to-school staple, and children’s jeans at Goodwill start at $4.99. Adult jeans start at $6.99.

Don’t forget to go beyond apparel. Check the racks for belts, purses, backpacks, dorm-room totes, shoes, desk décor, blankets and more.

What to look for

Here are our tips for shopping thrift for back to school:

  • Shop new with tags. Just because they are at a secondhand shop doesn’t mean they have been worn or used before.
  • If you have a child who goes to day care, shop thrift for items they can leave there rather than taking back and forth between home and day care, like changes of clothing, winter outerwear and blankets. The same is true for elementary-school kids who need art smocks (think oversized tees) and go outside for recess and need snow pants and boots.
  • Children grow so quickly year to year that sometimes they don’t have a chance to wear out their clothing before they have outgrown it. Winter coats can fall into that category. You will find some great-quality coats for a fraction of the cost.
  • Never pass up looking at the purses and bags sections. Find inexpensive laptop bags, backpacks and totes for all uses — to hold library books, craft supplies, toys for kids in the car, workout necessities for after school, clothes for sports practices and much more.
  • Have a teen girl? Shop the men’s section. Find this fall’s hottest trends, including oversized polos, massive hoodies, vintage button-ups and retro prints all in men’s.
  • Some clothing items are needed every year come fall. Sweatshirts and athletic apparel are two costly ones that top that list. Find new-to-you and budget-friendly options in name brands like The North Face, Adidas, Nike, Under Armour and more.

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

Restorative justice programs awarded $10,000 grant

MENASHA — Barron County Restorative Justice and Eau Claire Restorative Justice, programs of Goodwill NCW, have been awarded a $10,000 Mayo Clinic Health System Hometown Health Grant.

The restorative justice programs help adult and student community members make healthier choices through services such as victim-offender restorative conferencing, mentoring, accountability workshops, and restitution and community service programming that increases responsibility and empathy and leads to improved productivity at work, home and school.

The Mayo Clinic Health System Hometown Health Grant supports innovative efforts to improve mental health, prevent obesity, reduce chronic disease and address substance use and alcohol misuse in our community.

“We are extremely grateful to be a recipient of this generous grant award, “ said Monika Audette, program operations leader of Barron County Restorative Justice Programs. “We have felt the impact of COVID-19, and the need is much greater now. While our work continued during the statewide Safer at Home order, once it was lifted we felt an immediate call for our services in the community. We are grateful for the support for the impactful work we do from Mayo Clinic Health System.”

The award will be used to update existing cognitive behavior intervention programs, enhance early intervention substance abuse programming and allow Eau Claire Restorative Justice to invest in the technology equipment needed to present these programs.

According to the grant announcement, “Mayo Clinic Health System is focused on the health and wellbeing of area families, friends and neighbors. Your efforts are helping to improve our community, and we thank you for the work you do.”

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

Goodwill NCW teams up with Volunteer Fox Cities, Miron for Earth Day Donation Drive

MENASHA — Goodwill NCW is teaming up with Volunteer Fox Cities and Miron Construction for an Earth Day Donation Drive on April 22.

As a nonprofit human services organization, Goodwill NCW, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this month, uses revenue from the sale of donations to fund job training and other opportunities as part of its mission of Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment.

The Goodwill NCW truck will be at Miron Construction, 1471 McMahon Drive, Neenah, at the south end of the parking lot from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 22, to receive donations.

What to donate?

Goodwill accepts gently used shoes, handbags, home décor, jewelry, accessories, housewares, books, games, puzzles, small sporting equipment, holiday decorations, toys, linens and women’s, men’s and children’s clothing.

What can’t Goodwill accept?

Goodwill is unable to accept hazardous materials or other potentially harmful items. Some of the common items Goodwill NCW can’t accept are appliances, mattresses and baby gear like strollers and car seats because of concerns over safety recalls. Visit goodwillncw.org for more details.

April is Earth Month as well as National Volunteer Month. Goodwill NCW supports sustainability efforts like this one to keep items out of the landfill and care for the environment.

Goodwill NCW has been serving north central Wisconsin communities since April 1971. The need for donations hasn’t changed since Goodwill NCW’s founding and since the Goodwill movement got its start in 1902 in the basement of a Boston church. The Rev. Edgar J. Helms, a Methodist minister and early social innovator, collected used household goods and clothing in wealthier areas of Boston and then trained and hired those who were poor to mend and repair the used goods. The goods were either resold or given to the people who repaired them. The Goodwill philosophy of a hand up, not a handout was born. The need for donations has been growing strong since then.

 About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

 

Registration underway as Goodwill NCW’s Miracle League programs return with safety protocols

Registration is now open to both players and community volunteers for the 2021 Miracle League of the Fox Valley, Miracle League of the Lakeshore and Miracle League of the Chippewa Valley seasons.

Goodwill NCW sponsors three Miracle League programs across its 35 counties. Last year’s season was cancelled because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the 2021 season will take place with safety measures in place.

“We are excited to welcome everyone back to the field for the 2021 Miracle League season,” said Jennie Moore, Goodwill NCW Mission Services vice president. “The health and safety of our players, volunteers, families, community members and spectators are our top priority. While some procedures will look different this year, we are thrilled to have the opportunity to get children playing baseball again and building life skills.”

Miracle League is a program that gives children ages 4-19 with intellectual and/or physical disabilities the opportunity to play organized baseball in a noncompetitive league on a safe, accessible field with a synthetic surface. Each player is paired with a community volunteer. Community volunteers also serve as coaches, announcers and umpires during the typical eight-week season.

Goodwill NCW and the Miracle League programs will be following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and public health officials’ guidelines for the upcoming season, including local mask mandates, social-distancing practices and sanitization procedures. Since those guidelines are ever-evolving, safety procedures will be shared with all participants closer to the start of the season.

Here’s more detailed information on each of the programs:

Miracle League of the Fox Valley

The Miracle League of the Fox Valley is celebrating its 11th season of baseball in 2021. Games are played at the John Wollner Fox Cities Miracle Field at Memorial Park in Appleton.

The deadline for player registration is March 29, and community volunteers can register through May 17. Participants will be notified of their team in mid-May.

Because of the pandemic, there will not be an opening-day celebration this year. An all-league meeting for program participants will be held on Saturday, June 5, and the regular season gets underway on June 7. Each team plays one game a week at either 5:30 or 7 p.m. Monday/Wednesday or Tuesday/Thursday. There are no practices.

The cost is $45 per player. The fee includes a team jersey, cap, team picture, player insurance and end-of-the-season award.

For registration forms and more information, visit foxvalleymiracleleague.com.

Miracle League of the Lakeshore

The Miracle League of the Lakeshore is entering its seventh season at Goodwill Miracle Field of Dreams at Miracles Park in Manitowoc.

The deadline to register is March 29, and players will be notified of their team in early May. The $45 fee includes a team jersey, cap, team picture, player insurance and end-of-the-season award.

The season gets underway June 7, with games played Mondays and Wednesdays at 5:30 and 7 p.m. Each participant plays one game a week. Volunteers are needed to serve as buddies for the players.

The Miracle League of the Lakeshore also offers an over 19 All Star League. Individuals over 19 with intellectual and physical disabilities are encouraged to play. The All Star League plays on Wednesday nights. This will be the third season of this league.

For registration forms and more information, visit miracleleaguelakeshore.com.

Miracle League of the Chippewa Valley

The Miracle League of the Chippewa Valley is entering its fourth season, giving kids the incredible opportunity to play baseball on a barrier-free field.

The deadline to register a player is March 31. Volunteer/buddy registration will remain open until positions are filled. With the registration fee of $45, players receive a team jersey, hat, team picture and championship award. Players/buddies will be notified of their team in April.

Games are played at the Miracle Field at Jeffers Road Park, 5710 Jeffers Road, Eau Claire. The eight-week regular season gets underway June 7 and continues through the week of Aug. 2. An optional All-Star game will be played during the week of Aug. 2. Games will be played Mondays and Wednesdays at 5:45 and 7 p.m. Each participant/team plays one game a week.

To register a player or sign up to be a volunteer online, visit chippewavalleymiracleleague.com.

New book details the healing power of restorative justice

RICE LAKE — Local authors Monika Audette and Mary Hoeft have announced the release of their book, “From a Single Pebble: Barron County Restorative Justices Programs,” to tell the story of how the organization began and the impact it has had.

Monika Audette

“The book was more than a year in the making,” said Monika Audette, program operations leader of Barron County Restorative Justice Programs, a program of Goodwill NCW. “We hope it will appeal both to those wanting to start a program like ours and those interested in the touching stories that show how restorative justice heals.”

Mary Hoeft, professor emeritus of communication arts and French at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire-Barron County and a long-time restorative justice volunteer, said, “It was a work from my heart. I have witnessed the healing that comes to victims and offenders, and I want others to know about this powerful process.”

The book chronicles the impact Barron County Restorative Justice Programs has had on Barron County since the program’s inception in 1999, when Barron County Circuit Court Judge Ed Brunner set out to find a program that empowered victims and held offenders accountable in a new way.

Mary Hoeft

Mary Hoeft

Brunner sought a viable alternative to the incarceration of nonviolent offenders and found that alternative in a process called victim offender conferencing, which is now referred to as restorative conferencing.

Under the early leadership of then executive director Polly Wolner, Barron County Restorative Justice Programs began its work of restoring a community. Wolner expanded programming to include Victim Impact Panels, Teen Court, Prime for Life, and the School Community Outreach Program.

Twenty-one years after its formation, BCRJP’s menu of services also includes Safe Serve, Catch My Breath, Teen Traffic Violation Program and cognitive behavioral intervention programs for low- and medium-risk offenders.

Barron County Restorative Justice Programs, which became a program of Goodwill NCW in 2012, is considered one of the largest rural restorative justice programs in the country. Since its inception, more than 10,000 Barron County residents have felt the impact of restorative conferencing and another 10,000 residents have attended a Victim Impact Panel.

A 2008 study by UW-Eau Claire political science professor Dr. Eric Kasper confirmed the profound impact restorative justice had on Barron County, when he cited that the county’s juvenile arrest rate had decreased at a pace faster than the juvenile arrest rates in all of Wisconsin’s 71 remaining counties combined.

A 2019 study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute confirmed the impact Prime for Life and Victim Impact Panels were having on the drinking behavior of Barron County residents. Between 2013 and 2017, Barron County ranked lowest in the number of alcohol-related driving deaths in Wisconsin.

Since the May 25, 2020, death of George Floyd, community leaders across the country have called for an investment in community-based models of safety, support and prevention. Audette and Hoeft wrote their book so community leaders throughout the country could learn about the success of each of BCRJP’s restorative programs and discover that the programs fit their communities’ needs.

“From a Single Pebble: Barron County Restorative Justice Programs” is available for purchase online at amazon.com. Beginning Jan. 8, copies will be available to purchase at the Barron County Restorative Justice Programs office, 323 E. La Salle Ave., Barron. An open house and book signing will be held 1-3 p.m. Jan. 8. All proceeds from the sale of the book will go toward funding BCRJP.

Three business leaders join Goodwill NCW Board of Directors

MENASHA — Three business leaders have joined the Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin (NCW) Board of Directors.

As a member of Goodwill Industries International — a network of independently operated Goodwills, Goodwill NCW is governed by a board of directors made up of 11 volunteers and President/CEO Chris Hess and is led by Chairman Gregg Curry. Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization that uses donations and shopping purchases to fund job training and other opportunities as part of its mission of Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment.

The three new board members are:

Autumn Anfang of St. Norbert College: Autumn has more than 25 years of experience providing financial, operational and organizational strategic leadership in for-profit, nonprofit and higher education institutions. She is the Vice President of Business and Finance at St. Norbert College, with direct responsibility for Finance, Human Resources, Digital Transformation, Risk & Property Management, Facilities and Auxiliary & Hospitality Services. She previously worked at Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Before entering the higher education industry in 2011, she served in chief financial officer and finance leadership roles in the nonprofit, retail, telecommunications and banking sectors. Autumn has a master’s degree in accounting from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and earned her certified public accountant license upon graduation. She has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Georgia.

Michael Meinolf of Associated Bank: Michael Meinolf has been Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer of Associated Bank since September 2018. He joined Associated in April 2015 as Senior Vice President, Director of Business Solutions. With more than 20 years of information technology experience, Michael previously held the positions of Vice President, Technology Administration at The Clearing House Payments Co. and Director of Information Technology, PayDirect Government Solutions at FIS.

Jesse Ostrom of Thrivent Trust Co.: Jesse is the President and Chief Fiduciary Officer of Thrivent Trust Company. Jesse has worked in the trust and estate-planning industry for more than 20 years. As Chief Fiduciary Officer, Jesse leads the Advisor Services team, which includes Estate Planning, Personal Trust, Estate Settlement, and Fiduciary Tax. The Advisor Services team is staffed by more than 20 attorneys, CPAs, experienced trust officers and specialists who ensure services are provided in an effective and efficient manner. Jesse joined Thrivent Financial Bank in 2010. Before joining Thrivent, Jesse was a partner with a well-established firm where he practiced law for 13 years. A member of the Wisconsin Bar, Jesse holds a J.D. from the University of Wisconsin Law School and a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

Hess joins First Business Bank’s Northeast Wisconsin Advisory Board of Directors

NOV. 17, 2020 – First Business Bank, part of First Business Financial Services, Inc., today announces Chris Hess joined its Northeast Wisconsin Advisory Board of Directors.

“We are absolutely thrilled that Chris is joining the First Business Bank Northeast Wisconsin Advisory Board,” said Rick Hearden, President – Northeast Wisconsin Market. “He’s a true leader with a valuable perspective and experience building a community in which everyone can thrive.”

Chris is President and Chief Executive Officer of Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin. Since March 2018, Chris has been leading an organization that lives out its mission “Elevating people by Eliminating Barriers to Employment” through its programs, services, retail stores, and training centers across 35 counties.

Before joining Goodwill, Chris served as vice president of market development and sales for ThedaCare, a nonprofit healthcare organization. Chris also serves on the board of directors of the Fox Cities Chamber of Commerce and has been named one of Wisconsin’s most influential Black leaders. He is a Kenosha native who graduated from St. Norbert College and earned an MBA from UW-Oshkosh.

About First Business Bank
First Business Financial Services, Inc. (Nasdaq: FBIZ) is a bank holding company and parent of First Business Bank focused on the unique needs of businesses, business executives, and high net worth individuals. First Business offers business banking, specialty finance, and private wealth management solutions, and, through its niche focus, provides clients with unmatched expertise, accessibility, and responsiveness. Member FDIC, First Business Bank is located at 3913 W. Prospect Avenue in Appleton, Wis.

Goodwill NCW program receives Targeted Impact Fund grant

MENASHA — Barron County Restorative Justice, a program of Goodwill NCW, has received a $5,000 Targeted Impact Fund grant through Johnson Bank.

As a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank, Johnson Bank, which has a branch in Rice Lake, nominated Barron County Restorative Justice for the grant, which provides direct support to organizations that are addressing racial equity disparities in Wisconsin communities hardest hit by COVID-19 and that promote equity and opportunity for communities of color.

The Goodwill NCW program was nominated in the category of empowerment services for its work in serving populations hardest hit by COVID-19, including rural communities.

“In light of the country’s elevated conversations regarding systemic racism and social injustices, we felt the restorative justice program offered here in Barron County would benefit most from this Targeted Impact Fund grant,” said Mary Schnacky, Johnson Bank market president-Rice Lake. “For our rural communities, Barron County Restorative Justice demonstrates how they assist in keeping us safer by inviting open communication, not only between the victims and the offenders, but also by including the impacted community. It is through these well-needed conversations and educational opportunities where people are given a second chance to make a positive change in their lives and in their community.”

The grant program seeks to provide targeted relief for maximum community impact, according to Federal Home Loan Bank.

“We are incredibly honored that Johnson Bank nominated our organization,” said Monika Audette, program operations leader. “COVID-19 definitely has had an impact on us, and the need is much greater now. While our work continued during the statewide Safer at Home order, once it was lifted we felt an immediate call for our services in the community, especially in assisting our school families. We are grateful for this partnership and special community support from Johnson Bank and the Federal Home Loan Bank.”

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

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