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Tips to keep your holiday spending in check

Holiday Spending

With the holidays fast approaching, it’s a magical time of year for many. And there’s nothing better than finding the perfect gift for that special person.

The big question is, “How can I get that perfect gift without breaking the bank?”

Families and individuals can be challenged by the season of giving, which often means it’s a season of spending. It’s easy to get caught up in the shopping and glitz. Keep the joy in the holidays and the stress out by creating a spending plan. Following the plan will keep you from overspending and potentially racking up debt to tackle in the new year.

Here are some holiday shopping tips to keep spending under control:

1. Create a holiday spending plan

Set a limit on the total amount of money you want to spend and then allocate that total among these three key categories, being sure to track all expenses:

    • Gifts
    • Special meals, food and beverages
    • Decorations, cards, wrapping paper and postage/shipping

Sample plan

If your total holiday budget is $700, you might decide to spend:

    • $500 on gifts
    • $100 on food and beverages
    • $100 on decorations, wrapping and cards/postage
Shop smart

2. Use cash when shopping in stores, saving your credit cards for online shopping. People often stick to a budget better when they use cash.

3. Comparison shop before you buy.

4. Think outside the box. Sometimes the best gifts are homemade. You can find great inspiration and supplies at your local Goodwill and hobby stores.

5. Create a shopping list. Cross off gifts or names as you work through your list.

Happy New Year

Celebrate that you made it through the holiday season on plan! Then, instead of making credit card payments for what you bought, make monthly deposits into a savings account for next year’s holiday spending.

If you’re looking for additional guidance on how to create a budget, our financial counselors at FISC, a program of Goodwill NCW, can help you get started. Call us at 800-366-8161 or visit us online.

Here’s how to donate to Goodwill NCW this Giving Tuesday

Thanks for giving.

And for donating, shopping, supporting, caring and being so loyal.

As we mark Giving Tuesday, a global day of charitable giving that falls on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, we thank you for giving to Goodwill NCW in whatever shape it takes. By doing so, you help us provide job-skills training to people with disabilities and other barriers to employment, provide financial counseling to individuals and families who are in debt, give low-income taxpayers peace of mind in filing their tax returns at no cost and much more.

We offer programs and services across 35 counties that live out our mission of Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment.

You can support us in celebrating the possible by:

  • Donating material items to our 27 retail stores and training centers plus outlet store. The average donation supports more than three hours of job training and opportunities.
  • Donating financially. Because we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, your gift is tax-deductible. We have received the platinum seal of transparency from GuideStar, the world’s largest source of nonprofit information.
  • Donating a vehicle. We offer free towing and accept passenger cars in any condition, light trucks, minivans, full-size vans, motorcycles, boats, recreational vehicles and all-terrain vehicles. Find out more: goodwillncw.org/donate/cars.

Here’s a sample of how we put your donations to use and the programs you are supporting:

In the Fox Valley:

  • Contracted Services help businesses fill staffing gaps or complete tasks that may be more efficient to outsource, which can help improve the bottom line, while supporting job opportunities for individuals with barriers to employment.
  • Vocational Support Services supports people with disabilities in obtaining and maintaining employment in the community. Individuals served work at businesses in the community and are supported according to their work schedules and levels of need.

Central Wisconsin:

  • School-to-Work is a cooperative effort between Goodwill and school districts that provides valuable work experience for high-schoolers with disabilities.
  • Marathon County Restorative Justice offers alternative resolution processes that address conflict and crime and offers solutions to keep at-risk students in school because school success leads to career success.

Western Wisconsin:

  • Miracle League of the Chippewa Valley gives children ages 4-19 with intellectual and/or physical disabilities the opportunity to play organized baseball in a noncompetitive league on an accessible field with a synthetic surface. Players are paired with community volunteers and learn valuable skills in relationship-building, teamwork, communication and social engagement.
  • Learning Independent Future Environments (L.I.F.E.) is designed to provide high-schoolers with disabilities in Tomah the opportunity to learn independent living skills and receive vocational training.

Achiever of the Month efficient and focused

Katie Timmer began work with the Contracted Services program in late 2015 as a temporary placement when the Menasha Retail Store and Training Center was undergoing a major renovation.

“Katie did such a fantastic job while working with us we didn’t want to see her go,” said Tina Schaffert, Contracted Services and GoodWipers recycled wiping cloths area team leader. “We came up with a plan to have her work part time with Contracted Services and part time with the Menasha Goodwill, and what a winning combo it’s been!”

Katie, who has been chosesn as the October Achiever of the Month, has proven to be a very fast, efficient and focused worker who has mastered many of the program’s varied contracted jobs.

“She is someone we can turn to when we need a lot of items sorted for our GoodWipers department,” Tina said. “Her record for sorting bulk-size boxes in one work shift is 10. We came up with a new term — the Timmer Tower — because Katie will work so quickly, she creates large towers of sorted product in minutes.”

Job coach overcomes fear with inspiration from those she serves

No matter where Beth Kirsch lands after graduating from the medical assistant program at Fox Valley Technical College in December, she will take with her life-altering lessons she has learned from coaching people with disabilities.

For 14 years, Beth has served as a job coach for Vocational Support Services (VSS), which supports people with disabilities in obtaining and maintaining employment in the community. It is a program of Goodwill NCW that is part of the nonprofit organization’s mission of Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment.

As someone who has her own challenges and faces her own fears daily, the Neenah woman knows firsthand what it is like to work with a disability.

“I’ve always been interested in the medical field,” Beth said. “Out of high school I was pre-med and went to Marquette. Then I developed a mental illness. It was really bad.”

Beth dropped out of school, started receiving treatment for her mental illness, including electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and was put on Social Security disability. But after a while, “I knew I had to do something.”

She started working with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation to find a job. Knowing Beth enjoys helping people, DVR suggested she consider becoming a job coach and set her up with some interviews, including one with Vocational Support Services.

After receiving two job offers, Beth accepted the Goodwill one and initially started working 10 to 15 hours a week because of her medications and treatments. She has built her way up to 20 to 25 hours a week and for the past two years has juggled her job, school and her battle with mental illness.

It hasn’t been easy, but Beth is proud of her resiliency and her successes. And she is grateful.

“They worked with me. They understood my situation. I knew I couldn’t put in all these hours,” she said, noting that VSS accommodated her ECT and occasional hospital stays.

Her absence was missed but met with understanding and bouquets of flowers to help brighten her hospital room and her spirits.

“Goodwill gave me a chance when everything in my life was going downhill,” Beth said. “Forever I will be thankful for giving me a chance — a chance that helped change around my life forever.

“I’ve definitely gotten more confidence in myself. When I went away to college, I didn’t have any.”

“What really impresses me about Beth and the experiences she has shared as a team member is her ability to celebrate and recognize each person as just that … a person — a person, each with their own set of goals, abilities, passions, gifts, strengths and struggles,” said Kayla Countney, Vocational Support Services team leader. “Beth wholly embodies what it means to elevate, dignify and empower people, and I’m excited for her to continue impacting people on her journey. The people she coached for 14 years are better individuals and employees because of the passion, heart and support that Beth provided, and our team is better because Beth has been on it.”

Through the power of people with disabilities and their acceptance, Beth has gained the confidence she needs to face her own fears and challenges.

“I’m proud of them all for having a job. With me, having a job, I was scared to have a job. I didn’t think I could do anything. I felt like a failure. I see them and I see them having a job, and I’m proud of them. It’s hard. It’s hard having a job with a disability. And they are constantly proving themselves.”

In her first few years as a job coach, Beth was scared. Every new consumer was a new challenge and brought with it new fears.

“It was very rewarding, but it was challenging,” she said. “The smiles you get from your consumers and knowing that you are doing good in this world, it feels good. You feel good about yourself, like you are making a difference in this world.

“It makes me feel good helping others with disabilities because I know what that’s like.”

The Oshkosh native, whose dream is to work full time as a medical assistant and get off Social Security, learned the importance of treating others with respect and kindness from her parents and from her steadfast faith. “Everyone has dignity,” she said.

She also has met people along her journey who have taught her those same lessons, including another job coach who has mobility issues and struggles to walk. The two have connected over their common bond and the consumers they have seen accomplish more than what they once considered possible.

“They learned to do something that was difficult, and I can do the same,” Beth said.

“Not so long ago, people with disabilities weren’t allowed to work. And because of me and because of (job coaches), they are working, and they are making a difference in this world, too.”

Beth continues to find strength in her first two consumers, whom she has worked with for her entire 14 years with VSS.

One, who greets Beth with a hug every time they are together, used to live at home with her father but now lives independently. She has learned how to take the bus and now can successfully handle her fear of doctors, thanks to Beth’s encouragement and guidance.

The other builds her up and “melts her heart” every time he says, “Beth, you’re cute.” He struggles to talk and to understand but always does what Beth asks of him.

“It’s just amazing,” she said.

When the day comes soon to leave Goodwill and VSS, Beth knows it isn’t going to be easy — goodbyes and change rarely are — but she is now ready.

“I know what I’m doing,” she said. “I don’t have fears where I used to have fears. It’s going to be new and challenging, and it will take time to feel comfortable.”

But Beth will look to the people she has helped, and they will inspire her.

“They can do so much. Everyone can, and you have to continue to push them because you know they can do more. There’s no limit. I constantly see them accomplishing new things, and that gives me hope.”

Celebrating Brandon’s anniversary with hugs and cake

Contracted services celebrated Brandon Strobel’s 20th anniversary with the Goodwill NCW program with cake and appropriately lots of hugs, something the self-declared poetry king specializes in.

“Twenty years is an amazing thing,” said Paul Brunette, leader of contract services. “Brandon is a rock star when it comes to trying new jobs.”

Brandon, who also volunteers for the Neenah Police Department, recently moved into his own apartment, which has inspired some of the people he works with.

Laura said she was nervous and didn’t know what to expect when she started earlier this year with contract services, but Brandon “was really nice to me every day.” She hopes to one day soon move into an apartment like he has.

“Thank you, Brandon, for making me feel so welcome,” she said.

Others who spoke talked about how Brandon’s hugs make them feel better if they are having a bad day and that he’s “done a lot of great things.”

During the celebration, Paul cited Bruce Lee’s quote: “Life’s battles don’t always go to the stronger or the faster man. But sooner or later the man who wins is the man who thinks he can.”

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

Procrastination can have lasting impact on financial wellness

By Becky Smith

As Mark Twain once said, “If it’s your job to eat a frog, it’s best to do it first thing in the morning. And if it’s your job to eat two frogs, it’s best to eat the biggest one first.”

The frog is that one thing you have on your to-do list that you have absolutely no motivation to do and that you’re most likely to procrastinate on. Eating the frog means doing the task and doing it right away so you’re free to focus on other tasks without that nagging frog in the background.

This principle is commonly applied to organizing your work, but it can be effective in organizing your finances. You might already recognize that one thing you keep pushing off for another day.

What’s your frog? Calculating net worth? Creating a budget? Setting up a savings plan?

What we know to do and what we do don’t always match up. Add in a little procrastination and avoiding the frog can have a lasting impact on our financial wellness.

Financial Information and Service Center, a program of Goodwill NCW, offers free Power of Money workshops. Participants can discover proven ways to build a budget that works, spend less and save more, reduce debt, prepare for unexpected expenses and have financial peace of mind. These three-week classes are held on consecutive Tuesdays from 6 to 8:15 p.m. at the Goodwill Community Campus, 1800 Appleton Road, Menasha. To register, call 920-886-1000 or go online to www.fisc-cccs.org/workshops/the-power-of-money.

Here are a few financial tasks we often put off:

Calculating net worth — Assets minus liabilities. It seems simple enough, right? Knowing your net worth, either negative or positive, can be the motivator to make changes. A young earner with student loans and a vehicle loan easily can have a negative net worth. Over-extending credit cards can impact net worth. Too much mortgage and not enough money can impact net worth. Knowing if you are in a positive or negative financial position can be the impetus for change. Time to focus on debts or savings. Time to embrace a budget.

Creating a household budget — If your net worth is trending the wrong direction, a practical written budget can help control spending and free up money for savings. Ultimately, it can change your bottom line. Now, that’s exciting! Write the first draft of your budget based on how you think you spend. Then track your spending for a couple weeks or look back at your checking account statements and credit card statements. How do you really spend? What are you willing to adjust considering your net worth and your financial goals?

Setting up a savings plan — Automation is a procrastinator’s best friend. Does your employer offer a retirement plan you can participate in by payroll deduction? Check if you’ve maxed out the employer match, if offered. Talk to a financial adviser to further build your retirement savings.

Automate savings through your bank or credit union for specific household expenses. If you know your roof is good for five more years, set up an automatic transfer now. Your financial institution automatically can transfer a previously determined dollar amount every paycheck into the house savings for that upcoming expense.

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) are another opportunity to automate savings for future medical costs, but you need to sign paperwork to make it happen. Eat the frog.

We procrastinate for so many reasons. Maybe we don’t know what to do, or we’re fearful of what we’ll find, or we don’t see the reward.

If you are a financial procrastinator, please step forward. Identify the biggest frog and grab a fork! It might not be as awful or as complicated as you expect. When the deed is done you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment and relief. Energy spent on worry now can be focused on achieving your financial goals.

 About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

How do you feel about money?

By John Polakowski

We all have opinions and feelings about money. We love having enough — or more than enough — money and hate running short or living paycheck to paycheck.

Financial Information and Service Center, a program of Goodwill, offers free Power of Money workshops. Participants can discover proven ways to build a budget that works, spend less and save more, reduce debt, prepare for unexpected expenses and have financial peace of mind. These three-week classes are held on consecutive Tuesdays from 6 to 8:15 p.m. at the Goodwill Community Campus, 1800 Appleton Road, Menasha. To register, call 920-886-1000 or go online to www.fisc-cccs.org/workshops/the-power-of-money.

If we find ourselves in a pattern of having continuous debt, we often have self-defeating attitudes and beliefs about money. As Diane Harmony points out in “5 Gifts for an Abundant Life,” when we feel fear and believe that we do not have enough, that’s what we receive in return. We might feel embarrassed or depressed about that situation. What can we do about it?

One option is to explore our attitudes and feelings about money. Many of us grew up without learning about saving and using money wisely. We face an amazing variety of financial choices, including credit cards, debit cards, secured cards, check cards, payday loans and much more.

Try to recall your first experiences with money as a child. How did your parents or caregivers handle money? Did you or they treat money with gratitude or with fear? Did you think about needs and wants? Do you fall into the trap of believing that love, popularity, acceptance or appreciation equals money, especially if you have difficulty expressing your feeling about money?

As you wrestle with these questions, here are a few simple activities to do to help yourself develop positive feelings about money.

Write or say, “thank you,” for every check you write or bill you pay. Find an affirmation about financial abundance and write it down. Then speak it out loud, preferably in front of a mirror. State it with gratitude and acceptance. One example would be: “I am excited to know that my financial needs are being met!” Another would be: “I know that I deserve to have enough money!” Start a gratitude journal where you write a list of things you feel grateful for each day. You’ll find yourself having more positive energy, including about the flow of money.

In “It’s Not Your Money,” Tosha Silver states that the more we release blame, resentment and shame, the more we will be open to receiving. She gives this advice: “Instead of complaining that we’re always broke, we need to think about what we need and let it come.”

Here are some of her suggestions to get into the flow of money: give something away, pay for someone’s meal, do whatever it takes to feel prosperous, insist you do have enough and be grateful for what you have.

One of the daily steps Tosha tells us to take is to say, “It’s easy for me to receive.” What a pleasant way for us to develop a positive attitude about money!

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, unique shopping experiences at its boutiques and Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

Christmas in July: Tips on making a holiday spending plan

By Jodi Moynihan

It happens every year. Sometime in summer, that one super organized friend will tell you how she has started her Christmas shopping already.

No matter how much you love Christmas and Christmas shopping, it takes extra planning and preparing to think about the people you need to buy gifts for and how much you are going to spend on them when it’s 85 degrees outside.

But if you don’t get started on your holiday shopping until the snow flies, haven’t done any saving and rely solely on your credit cards for payment, it’s time to break the cycle.

“How can I do that since it’s already July?” you say. Below are some simple tips to get a head start on this year. By the end of the holiday season, you will have developed a new habit to lead you into the new year.

You, too, can be like your super organized friend by planning ahead, making a list and not getting caught in the same trap you have fallen into in previous years.

Financial Information and Service Center, a program of Goodwill, offers free Power of Money workshops. Participants can discover proven ways to build a budget that works, spend less and save more, reduce debt, prepare for unexpected expenses and have financial peace of mind. These three-week classes are held on consecutive Tuesdays from 6 to 8:15 p.m. at the Goodwill Community Campus, 1800 Appleton Road, Menasha. To register, call 920-886-1000 or go online to https://www.fisc-cccs.org/workshops/the-power-of-money.

Here are FISC’s tips on how to make a holiday spending plan.

Make a list of whom you want to buy for. This may seem silly because you think you know, but when you start writing it down, there are more people than you realize. Kids, parents, siblings, spouse or significant other, in-laws, grandparents. But what about nieces and nephews, teachers, neighbors, friends? Especially if you have a large family, do you buy for all? How about drawing names and agreeing to spend the same amount? Make a list and stick to it.

Determine how much you can afford to spend. What we’d like to spend and what our budget will allow us to spend are often not the same. If you decide $600 ($50 a month) is what you can afford, write what you will spend next to each name from your list above to total no more than that. If you truly want to extend the gift-giving to all those nieces and nephews, it may only be $5 per person, and that’s OK.

Set money aside each month. Whether you follow the envelope system, have a put-and-take savings account or a separate Christmas savings account, designate Christmas money and do not touch it during the year, unless you are Christmas shopping. If you use credit cards to pay for gifts and do not pay off your statement in full each month, the $600 you spent could turn in to hundreds more with interest, depending on how long it takes you to pay them off.

Watch sales throughout the year. You do not have to buy only during the holiday season. In fact, those sales may not really be sales at all. Know your prices, and when you see a good deal, reach into that Christmas account and feel good about it.

Use layaway programs. When I was a child, my parents would shop early in the year, put items on layaway at the store, make payments to the store each month until the items were paid off and pick up the items shortly before Christmas. We would do that with school clothes, too. Stores started getting away from that option years ago but have started bringing it back again.

Give homemade gifts. Each year I make cookies, candies and jams that I give to the family member who needs nothing but I still want to do something for. These gifts often are more appreciated because they truly come from the heart.

Tired of the stress and pressure to buy just the right thing? Consider giving to a charity that helps those in need during the holidays and cold weather such as assisting a warming shelter whether it be with food or gifts. This is also a great way to help your children learn about supporting nonprofit organizations, helping those in need and understanding how much they really do have.

Today is the perfect day to start that list, look at your budget and make some adjustments to plan for your holiday spending. Having a plan and putting it into action will give you a new appreciation for the holidays. You will have time to spend with your family and friends by focusing on their presence rather than their presents. And you will not have a Christmas hangover when you get your credit card bills because even those will be paid through your Christmas fund. The joy and love of the holiday season will be yours to enjoy again.

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a not-for-profit human services organization that believes in Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. Goodwill NCW is one of four companies in the nation to be honored with a Platinum Well Workplace Award from the Wellness Council of America, which recognizes our commitment to wellness in the workplace. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, a unique shopping experience at its Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.reStitch.com, a women’s apparel website, and www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

 

Contractivity program and Pierce celebrate partnership

A Goodwill job-training program celebrated a special milestone and its partnership with Pierce Manufacturing, an Oshkosh Corp. Co., at the Goodwill Shiner Center in Appleton on Tuesday.

Since 2014, Contractivity has been working with Pierce Manufacturing in cleaning and repackaging safety glasses into plastic sleeves. Team members and visitors at Pierce are required to wear safety glasses on site. Earlier this year, Contractivity marked its 100,000 pair of completed safety glasses.

Contractivity is a program that assists businesses in accomplishing tasks that aren’t cost-effective to be performed in-house while providing job training to people with barriers to employment.

“We’re so happy to work with you on these glasses,” said Aimeè McClure, senior environmental manager with Pierce, adding that the partnership keeps used safety glasses out of the landfill and provides cost savings.

The partnership has given 58 program participants a total of 3,196 hours of job-skills training over five years.

“We’re really, really thankful for this partnership,” said Paul Brunette, Contractivity program leader.

Brandon Strobel, who has been with Goodwill since 1999, was recognized for having the highest number of tracked hours devoted to the Pierce job. Brandon worked more than 300 hours on this contract.

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a nonprofit human services organization whose mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, a unique shopping experience at its Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.reStitch.com, a women’s apparel website, and www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

 

 

Deployed husband’s gift accidentally donated

If you love a story with a happy ending, this one is for you!

Molly Cook, customer experience team leader at the Oshkosh Retail Store and Training Center, received a frantic phone call on a May evening from a woman, who said she was in the middle of a move and her jewelry box had been donated to that Goodwill by mistake.

“She began to cry and explained that it wasn’t the jewelry box itself, but she had put a necklace from her husband in the box and it was the last thing he had bought her before he was deployed overseas,” Molly said.

Molly also received a call from the soldier’s mom, who was just as upset and crying. She understood the importance of finding the special necklace.

Locating this donation posed an added challenge because donations are sorted immediately, and, in this case, the jewelry would have been sent to the ecommerce team at the Goodwill Shiner Center in Appleton and the jewelry box would have been priced and put on the store floor.

Molly acted quickly to catch the crew that already had left for the day by emailing the entire team and then talking to team members first thing the next morning.

When store team leader Jessica Kostuck heard about the donor’s situation, she remembered putting a jewelry box next to a pricing station and took off to look for it.

And there it was — the necklace still inside!

“This was definitely one of my favorite moments here at Goodwill,” said Molly, adding that the grateful woman stopped in a week later with a thank you card for the team. “I was amazed we found this donation with how many donations Oshkosh gets on the weekend! So happy it worked out the way it did.”

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a not-for-profit human services organization that believes in Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. Goodwill NCW is one of four companies in the nation to be honored with a Platinum Well Workplace Award from the Wellness Council of America, which recognizes our commitment to wellness in the workplace. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, a unique shopping experience at its Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.reStitch.com, a women’s apparel website, and www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

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