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Restorative justice program leader receives community award

The Wausau Police Department hosts an annual awards banquet to celebrate the great work performed by the WPD staff and community partners.

This year, Paula Schultz, leader of Marathon County Restorative Justice, a program of Goodwill, received the Community Caretaker Award at the March 5 banquet.

The community caretaker honor is usually awarded to a law enforcement officer in recognition of efforts to assist citizens in a variety of ways. This year Paula was nominated for the award because of the work she does to improve the lives of youth, families and community partners through the Marathon County Restorative Justice program.

Paula demonstrates compassion in everything she does. She goes above and beyond to champion the rights of both victims and offenders. She has a gift in her ability to make connections with those who face adversity and uses her talent to help youth find success despite any barriers they may face.

Oshkosh teachers see life-changing work of Goodwill program

Goodwill’s School-to-Work program has provided positive, life-changing experiences for the Oshkosh West High School students that teachers Kris Steinhilber and Patti Kimball have brought through at the Oshkosh Retail Store and Training Center on 20th Avenue.

Tyler Andre, 18, is one of them.

“He needs to get out and get into the community,” his father Michael Andre said. “By going out in the community and working like this, he gets to meet new people.”

School-to-Work is a cooperative effort between Goodwill and school districts that provides valuable work experience for high school students with special needs. These work experiences help to bridge the gap between the classroom and working in the community.

One source of pride is that Tyler’s leaders and the other Goodwill team members gave him his first nickname — Big T. Tyler insists his mom and dad can’t use it, saving it only for his Goodwill family. For Tyler, who is chatty and talkative, the experience offers a social aspect, one that he doesn’t have at school, Michael said.

“It’s something different in his life,” Michael said.

Not only have his parents seen an improvement in his confidence and level of independence and responsibility, but they are grateful that he has been embraced and has a place to belong, including having a social network.

“Everybody wants to have friends,” his mother Debra Andre.

“Goodwill’s team consistently provides an atmosphere of feeling valued,” Kris said. “The store’s team is engaging, forgiving, kind and has positive energy each shift we work. Our students pick up on this immediately. It gives them the environment they need to learn and succeed not only in work relationships but also helps foster a productive work ethic. It is one of the safest, most nonjudgmental environments we have worked in.”

Never having worked before, Tyler was thrust into a new experience for the 2017-18 school year when he joined the Goodwill store and learned how to use a timeclock, communicate with team leaders, work in teams and learn the task he was assigned and how to do it in a timely, correct manner. He caught on quickly, and the teachers began to push Tyler with increased responsibilities.

Enthusiastically greeting everyone he can, Tyler works five shifts a week, taking the city bus as transportation. He has learned the routes, is timely and never has missed a bus yet.

“I love working at Goodwill,” he said.

Because it is a School-to-Work program, there is no work when school is not in session, which is something that disappoints Tyler.

“This past winter, Oshkosh was expecting some bad weather,” Kris said. “The talk of perhaps school closing the next day bothered Tyler. He came to us during the school day and asked if he could join the team going that day, as he would miss his shift the next day if school was cancelled. That took some forethought, and we are proud that Tyler has taken ownership of his work shifts.”

“I have seen the impact Goodwill has made on this young man,” said Molly Cook, customer experience team leader at the Goodwill Oshkosh Retail Store and Training Center. “From what I hear he was a struggling student who was not very independent and Goodwill has changed that around for him and given him something to strive for.”

Kris and Patti understand and see how life-changing Tyler’s experience at Goodwill has been.

“We are proud of Tyler and his work ethic at Goodwill. Tyler’s work brings him a sense of pride and self-confidence we don’t always see from him. … We know in the years ahead what Tyler gleaned from this experience will serve him well in his work future,” Kris said.

“When people speak to him about Goodwill he refers to it as ‘my Goodwill.’ Tyler suggests to people to shop at ‘my Goodwill.’ ‘Maybe you could check at my Goodwill. I work there.’ He takes such pride in the store and the work that he does.”

“He loves it. He loves doing it,” Michael said. “He loves the experience. He loves the people.”

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a not-for-profit human services organization that in 2017 helped improve the lives of more than 70,000 people across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. Goodwill NCW is one of four companies in the nation to be honored with a Platinum Well Workplace Award from the Wellness Council of America, which recognizes our commitment to wellness in the workplace. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, a unique shopping experience at its Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.reStitch.com, a women’s apparel website, and www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

Don Hollaway honored as local hero

Don Hollaway, IT network administrator, was honored at a March 6 Herd basketball game in Oshkosh for being a local hero and going above and beyond to support the community. Joined by his children, Don was recognized in front of the fans at center court before the home game.

Don Hollaway honored
Don was nominated and honored because he:

• Counsels men weekly in the Outagamie County Jail with financial advice and emotional support. He has done this for more than 10 years.
• Participates in cooking for Pillars warming shelter and runs the monthly meal with his church group. He also organized a group at his church to help with donations.
• Volunteers every year to help set up technology for Lifest in Oshkosh.
• Volunteers to set up computers and printers for the yearly JDRF fundraiser.
• Volunteers at his church to set up technology and offers technical support.
• He’s also a great single dad!

A story of tragedy and a lesson for all

Barron County Restorative Justice is a program of Goodwill. Kim Lee and her son, Hunter, got involved with the program several years ago after the loss of their son and brother Dylan. Hunter’s father was driving drunk on Thanksgiving when he was in a car accident that killed Dylan. This is their story.

Program participant’s 20 years of success celebrated

The team at Oshkosh Retail Store and Training Center recently celebrated Andy Yohn’s 20th anniversary with Goodwill with cake and pizza. And while all anniversaries are special, this one is especially meaningful.

Before joining the store, Andy worked at the Appleton Shiner Center in Goodwill’s Contractivity! program, which gives people with barriers to employment job-training opportunities. He worked there for 19 years, until his father unexpectedly passed away in 2017. After his father’s death, Andy moved into a group home in Oshkosh and no longer had transportation options to Appleton.

Through Vocational Support Services, a program of Goodwill that supports people with disabilities in obtaining and maintaining employment in the community, Andy was welcomed to the Oshkosh Retail Store and Training Center team in early 2018. Through the help of store leadership and his job coaches, Andy transitioned well into this new position.

“Andy is autistic and nonverbal so no one was sure how he was going to handle all the change he had in such a short period of time,” said Erin Dey, Oshkosh Retail Store and Training Center store team leader. “There were concerns he would struggle with the transition. We are happy to say that all the concerns never happened, and he is excelling in his role here.”

After months of successfully bagging toys and pricing new items, Andy transitioned to merchandising, as store leaders recognized Andy was capable of more and needed to be challenged.

“He is happy and smiling a lot when working. He likes to stay working so if you stop to talk too long to him or his job coach, he just keeps moving, doing what he is working on,” Erin said. “We look forward to many more years with Andy and seeing the growth he still has in his role with us.”

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a not-for-profit human services organization that in 2017 helped improve the lives of more than 70,000 people across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. Goodwill NCW is one of four companies in the nation to be honored with a Platinum Well Workplace Award from the Wellness Council of America, which recognizes our commitment to wellness in the workplace. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, a unique shopping experience at its Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.reStitch.com, a women’s apparel website, and www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

 

Sights set on new TV? Here’s how to e-cycle old one

With the Super Bowl coming up Feb. 3, millions of football fans will be tuning in to the big game.

And that means the oldie but goodie TV that has had its place in the family room armoire for going on a decade now might not cut it for this year’s pigskin showdown.

While people often associate Black Friday with massive TV sales, according to Popular Science, the time leading up to the Super Bowl is when many of the higher-end TVs go on sale.

Consumer Reports says the second-best discounts on TVs come right before the Super Bowl.

When it comes to in with the new and out with the old, here are some tips on how to best e-cycle your television.

Be aware. There’s a good way and a bad way to dispose of your TV. We’ve all seen TV sets dumped on the side of the highway or hidden in the bottom of garbage cans, only to find their way to a landfill. Old-style cathode ray tube sets contain such toxic materials as lead and mercury and need to be recycled properly to avoid a negative impact on the environment and unsafe conditions for the people handling them.

“They have to be handled properly. If people just throw them away, it could be a hazardous-materials situation,” said Ann Ward, Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin post retail sales operations leader. “It can be dangerous.”

Be prepared to pay. Because there is a cost to properly recycle electronics, companies and municipalities are charging consumers to help cover the costs to properly recycle televisions, said John Cook, Goodwill NCW vice president of supply chain and Shiner Center operations.

“The reality is we paid almost $33,000 in e-cycling in 2018,” said John Cook, Goodwill NCW vice president of supply chain and Shiner Center operations, noting that the cost includes TVs and other electronics such as computers and cellphones.

In 2015, Americans had about 5 billion pounds’ worth of CRT TVs in their homes, according to a survey from the Electronics Recycling Coordination Clearinghouse, a pro-recycling nonprofit organization.

Shop around. Even though there is a cost to the consumer for recycling, the fees vary, and it pays to shop around.

Goodwill NCW accepts TVs at its Shiner Center and Outlet Store location at 1341 W. Spencer St., Appleton, which allows for the proper recycling of televisions. All TVs — regardless of size and if they are a tube TV or flat screen — are just $15 each to donate for e-cycling.

Donation hours are 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Many businesses charge recycling fees based on the size of the TV or monitor, starting from $20 to $25 and going up to the $40 range.

Other electronics such as laptops, computer accessories, radios and cellphones can be donated to any Goodwill location at no cost.

Do your homework. If you aren’t sure where to start with e-cycling, start with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Go to https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/Ecycle/wisconsin.html to get an overview of the E-Cycle Wisconsin program. To find a place to take your electronics for recycling, click on find on the right side under electronics recycling for a nearby collection site.

“It’s a good resource, especially if you’re worried about data and if it’s not something we will take or there’s not a Goodwill by you,” Ann said.

All laptops, computers and cellphones donated to Goodwill NCW are wiped before they are sold, and all items being e-cycled are sent to a company that has been certified through the Wisconsin DNR to ensure data security won’t be compromised.

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a not-for-profit human services organization that in 2017 helped improve the lives of more than 70,000 people across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. Goodwill NCW is one of four companies in the nation to be honored with a Platinum Well Workplace Award from the Wellness Council of America, which recognizes our commitment to wellness in the workplace. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, a unique shopping experience at its Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.reStitch.com, a women’s apparel website, and www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

Almost Home makes mom’s dream of home ownership a reality

Everyone wants to be home for the holidays, and this year, Shantelly, a single mom with three children, is grateful she has a house to come home to.

Through Almost Home, a program of Goodwill in partnership with Fox Cities Habitat for Humanity, Shantelly put in the work necessary to become the first person in her family to own a home.

We followed her story for a year and are thrilled to share this video and say, “Welcome home, Shantelly.”

At 85, Lily reflects Goodwill’s mission

Lily has been a positive light to our Neenah Retail Store and Training Center the past five years. Hear how she finds value in working at 85 and takes pride in being an example for others in working hard and accepting everyone.

Goodwill gives team member ‘better outlook on life’

This Thanksgiving, Theresa Granados is grateful for her job and a second chance.

Two years ago, Theresa, 48, found herself downsized out of a computer programming job she had held for 18 years.

With most of her severance pay going toward credit card payments, only one week of medical benefits coverage and a reliance on her income along with her husband’s, she began to panic.

“The job hunt was urgent and daunting,” Theresa said.

“I quickly realized that having the same job for 18 years with no continuing education to enhance skills for new computer technology that I may not have the job skills to enter the job market quickly.”

Theresa said she faced barriers to employment after being out of school for so long and backed out of taking a college competency exam twice. She realized she was either going to have to go back to school or find a new career.

After spotting a job posting for Goodwill — a place she shops frequently — she decided to apply for it and after the interview process was hired as an ecommerce specialist, where she lists donated items for sale online by doing research, taking photos and writing descriptions.

“(Goodwill was) willing to work with me.”

The transition wasn’t without its challenges, however.

After being at the same company for nearly two decades and coming in to a new environment with a different leader, Theresa was nervous about the change and being the new person. She also carried with her negative thoughts from her previous job, where she felt heavily criticized and beat down.

“In my prior job we weren’t allowed to make mistakes. What I’ve found that I’m grateful for at Goodwill is that we are treated like we are human.”

Goodwill, she said, has been willing to deal with the human element of what happens in life and mirrors its values in taking a people- and relationships-first attitude.

“Programming was a very sedentary job, and it was never rewarding,” said Theresa, noting that she also has taken advantage of one of Goodwill’s programs, Financial Information and Service Center, to help her with bill payments and finances. “I didn’t even see the light until I worked at Goodwill.”

Having less stress, more movement in her body, confidence, energy and flexibility “gave me new hope and a better outlook on life.” Not only did Theresa lose weight, but she eliminated a chronic illness and back pain from her life and is much happier.

Theresa realized how noticeable the change in her was when her dad recognized the physical and mental improvements.

“It’s obvious how much this job has changed me.”

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a not-for-profit human services organization that in 2017 helped improve the lives of more than 70,000 people across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. Goodwill NCW is one of four companies in the nation to be honored with a Platinum Well Workplace Award from the Wellness Council of America, which recognizes our commitment to wellness in the workplace. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, a unique shopping experience at its Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.reStitch.com, a women’s apparel website, and www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

 

How to wear a vest the best

By Carly Fuller

Vests are this season’s it piece, and we think every closet should have multiple options. With so many styles, colors and fabrics out there, why just stop at one? They are versatile, trendy, and some even act like an accessory, adding just the right touch to complete an outfit. We urge you to jump right on the vest train and not be intimidated by the wealth of options available. Read on and we’ll show you how to wear a vest the best.

Puffer vest

Undoubtedly the most common, there is no shortage of puffer vests available, but we think this floral one stands out from the crowd. The florals add a feminine touch and the mix of earthy tones has us swooning. Pair it with a mustard sweater, raw-edge skinnies and camel-colored ankle booties for a truly laid-back yet stylish look.

Faux fur vest

If you haven’t yet jumped on the faux fur vest train, you’re missing out, friend! These vests make any outfit feel more luxurious and chic. While there is no denying the faux fur vest trend is the new it thing, it might be a little bold for some and that’s okay because there are options that take a more subtle approach. Take this BKE vest, for example, and treat it more like a fuzzy cardigan. It doesn’t necessarily scream fur but looks more like the cozy side of your favorite throw blanket. We especially like this one because of its longer length and slimming lines. Pair it with a tighter-fitting long-sleeve top and skinnies to keep you from looking too heavy.

Cargo vest

Cargo vests are so versatile and go with everything, don’t they? Try it over skinnies and a flannel, chambray, sweater, peplum top or striped long-sleeve tee. Try it with a black or plum-colored dress. Throw on a chunky knit scarf, a hobo crossbody bag or a long pendant necklace. The cargo vest is so versatile, it really should be treated like an accessory! We assure you that if you wear one of these babies, you’ll look like you know how to wear a vest the best.

Sherpa vest

Another hot, hot, hot trend this fall is sherpa everything. While some workplaces might frown on a sherpa pullover and jeans, you could grab yourself a sherpa vest like this one from Mossimo and throw it over a chambray dress for work and add a blanket scarf for extra style cred. Try a sherpa vest with a hoodie and joggers for a little weekend or post-gym flair.

Quilted vest

We love us a vest option that can we worn outside and inside. A thinner quilted vest, like this one from Croft & Barrow, is the best of both worlds. We think it would pair beautifully with a plaid flannel shirt (find more on pattern mixing here), a great pair of distressed jeans, a beanie and duck boots. If you are looking for something a little less casual, try it over a solid, jewel-toned dress or coupled with a cowl neck-sweater for a look with a built-in scarf.

About Goodwill: Goodwill NCW is a not-for-profit human services organization that in 2017 helped improve the lives of more than 70,000 people across 35 counties in north central Wisconsin. Goodwill NCW is one of four companies in the nation to be honored with a Platinum Well Workplace Award from the Wellness Council of America, which recognizes our commitment to wellness in the workplace. The organization includes 27 retail stores and training centers in communities from Manitowoc to La Crosse, 24 human services programs, a unique shopping experience at its Appleton outlet store, plus online shopping at www.reStitch.com, a women’s apparel website, and www.shopgoodwill.com. It offers four Donation Express sites and 10 convenient donation bins throughout the Fox Cities. Goodwill NCW is a Platinum Level member of GuideStar.org, the world’s largest source of nonprofit organization information. Visit www.goodwillncw.org.

 

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